Category: free

Super Simple Spiral DC Beanie

Sometimes I like to make crazy hats.  One time I made minion hats as part of the costumes for Igor and I to wear to a nerd outing.  Another time I made some as fake hair, and even one with a hook through the head.  Many of these hats start out as a very basic beanie.  I don’t want to be bothered with joining or seams when making them so I made a video to show you how I make them.  They are made in rounds like amigurumi, so they don’t have the concentric circles a normally joined DC beanie would have.  But they do start off with a spiral so they may or may not work for what you are trying to do with them.

Super Simple Spiral DC Beanie

Super Simple Spiral DC Beanie

View the video here:

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Trying Something New – Pod (Audio) Pattern

I’m really excited to have people try this out.  It may be crazy, but then again, nobody has ever accused me of being sane.  I’ve decided to try putting one of my patterns in audio format and make it available as a pod pattern.  It’s in mp3 format, so can be put on your phone or other compatible music player.  This particular pattern is to make a peanut and has a little story to go along with it.  As this is a test, I’m just using an existing quick pattern to try it out.  The original peanut pattern is here.  But if you do decide to give this format a try, please do try to work only from the audio and not the pattern page.  This will ensure a real fair test to see if it works.  I believe you can just click the link below to play it on your computer or you can right-click to download it.  And please do let me know in comments, or by using the contact form, what you think of it.  I hope you have fun with it!

Peanut Pod Pattern

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Lady Cassandra

I started watching Doctor Who episodes when I was commissioned to make some dolls from the show.  It was research, don’t you know?  😉  But one episode really creeped me out.  It was the one in which Lady Cassandra, the last human, is introduced.  Even though she claims to be the last human, she has basically deteriorated into just a remaining piece of skin with a face and a brain in a jar, even though she seems to think she has improved over time.  She continually needs to be moisturized so she doesn’t dry out.  Anyway, she bothered me so I had to get her out of my head and out onto my hook.  This is the result.  It’s super easy and in video form.  Skills needed to complete her are CH, SC, SC from the Back, HDC, DC.  I’ve also made a video to show how the SC from the back is done and you can link to it from inside the video if you need to refer to it.  As with all my patterns, it is copyrighted to me, Mad Crochet Lab, all rights reserved, 2014, and should not be downloaded or embedded elsewhere.  The only benefit I receive for free patterns is the traffic at my sites.  If you want to share with someone, please just give them the link. Thank you!

Free Lady Cassandra Video Pattern

Free Lady Cassandra Video Pattern

View the video right here:

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Free Filet Starter Charts – Caged Bird

I recently ran a little Crochet-A-Long to introduce some crocheters to doing filet. I came up with these charts because they are simply shaped, don’t require any increasing or decreasing, and make a cute little picture of a caged bird.

 

filetbirdcagefinishedlook

Piece A on left, Piece B on right.

 

To make them, you will need a size 7 steel hook, size 10 bedspread weight cotton, and know how to CH, SC, and DC.

[purchase_link id=”2351″ color=”blue” text=”Purchase” direct=”true”]

 

Preliminary Filet Info

These charts are both done using US crochet terms, and in the more popular way of using 4 stitches to complete a block (some others are done with only three DCs to fill a block or use TCs instead of DCs). A filled block will consist of 4 DCs but it will share the last one with the next block. So the last DC of one block is the first of the next. An open block will consist of a DC, two CHs and a DC. This applies to both charts. A double open block is simply two open mesh blocks combined. So it consists of a DC, 5 CHs and a DC. And a lacet is created by using two rows. On the first row of a lacet, you make a DC, CH3, skip 2 CHs and SC in the 3rd, then CH3, skip 2 CHs and DC. On the next row when you get to that lacet again, you just DC, CH5 and DC. I will include some graphics to show it, but wanted to explain it because some people learn better by reading and others by photos.

It doesn’t matter whether you crochet lefty or righty.  All that matters is you read the charts from right to left on all odd rows, and left to right on all even rows. I’ve named the chart on the left as Piece A, and the one on the right is Piece B.  As you can see, Piece B is slightly simpler because it does not contain any lacet blocks.  But since the stitches are so simple to create either look, do not be intimidated by the lacets.

Here I will step you through the first five rows and you can take it from there.  The pdf download is complete with graph charts and symbol charts.  The following is only additional info to “hold your hand through the first five rows.”  If you complete this project and like it, I highly recommend you do some online research of filet crochet, learning how to increase and decrease and open a whole new world of crochet for yourself.  Enjoy.

ROW 1. CH 82. Reading chart from right to left – DC in 4th CH from hook and in each across. This applies to both Piece A and Piece B. What you have now in your hands is not just a bunch of DCs. You are holding 26 filled blocks from the graph!

ROW 2. (Reading chart from left to right now)

  • Piece A – 4 DC including your turning CH or standing DC to make a filled block, then CH 3, skip 2 stitches, SC in next, CH 3, skip 2 stitches and DC. Repeat 10 more times, CH 3, skip 2 stitches, SC in next, CH 3, skip 2 stitches then end with 4 DCs.
  • Piece B – 4 DC including your turning CH or standing DC to make a filled block, then CH 2, skip 2 stitches, and DC. Repeat 22 more times, then CH 2, skip 2 stitches and make 4 DCs.

ROW 3. (Reading chart from right to left now)

  • Piece A – 4 DC including your turning CH or standing DC to make a filled block, then CH 5, skip 5 stitches and DC. Repeat 10 times and then CH 5, skip 5 stitches and 4 DCs.
  • Piece B – repeat Row 2.

ROW 4. (reading chart from left to right)

  • Piece A – It’s a filled block, the beginning of a lacet, 20 filled blocks, another beginning of a lacet, and ends with a filled block so… that’s 4 DCs, CH 3, skip 2 stitches, SC in next, CH3, skip 2 stitches and DC. That last DC is the last stitch in the lacet and also the first stitch in the first filled block. So I start counting 3 DCs for each filled block as I go now. I count 1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3…until I complete all 20 filled blocks. Then it’s CH 3, skip 2 stitches, SC in next, CH 3, skip 2 stitches and finish with a 4 DCs.
  • Piece B – This line consists of a filled block, two open blocks, 20 filled blocks, 2 open and a closed. So it’s 4 DCs, CH 2, DC, CH 2, DC. That last DC is the last stitch in the last open block and also the first stitch in the first filled block. So I start counting 3 DCs for each filled block as I go now. I count 1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3…until I complete all 20 filled blocks. Then it’s CH 2, DC, CH 2, and end with 4 DCs.

ROW 5 – (reading chart from right to left now)

  • Piece A – this row contains the 2nd part of a lacet, a filled block, an open block, 8 double open blocks, an open block, a filled block, a 2nd part of a lacet and a filled block so…. it’s 4 DCs, then CH5, 4 DCs, CH 2, DC, (CH 5, DC) 7 times, then CH 5 and 4 DCs, CH 2, 4 DCs, CH 5, end with 4 DCs.
  • Piece B – this row contains a filled block, 2 open blocks, a filled block, 18 open blocks, a filled block, 2 open blocks and a filled block so… it’s 4 DCs, CH 2, DC, CH 2, 4 DCs, (CH 2, DC) 17 times, then CH 2 and 4 DCs, CH 2, DC, CH 2, 4 DCs.
Continue following chart for each row.  Finish off. Block your finished filet by covering a piece of foam, corkboard or other similar material with plastic wrap, stretching and pinning your piece in shape, and spraying with a warm water.  A small piece like this will dry overnight. Tips – you can wash your piece by hand with mild detergent and warm water and reblock whenever it needs it.  Always have clean hands when making filet, especially with white thread.  Rubbing you eyes and working on it is not a good idea.  Mascara is tough to get out of your work!  😉
Here are some photos of the finished pieces from the CAL.  It was a lot of fun and with such talented hookers who took to it like ducks to water!
filetdorthebird

by Dorthe of Crafty Duddles

filetannebird

by Anne of Crafted Whimzies

filetkeelybluebird

by keely of CraftyDoodles

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